The Trial of the Pyx – What is it, and why does it exist?

trial of the pyx
The Trial of the Pyx is one of Britain’s longest-established judicial ceremonies; held since the 12th century and remaining largely unchanged since that date and Henry III’s reign.

The word ‘pyx’ comes from the Latin word ‘pyxis’ or small box, and in this case refers to the chests used to store and transport the coins ready for the trial. Throughout the year, coins are randomly selected from every batch and denomination struck, sealed in bags of 50 and locked away in ‘Pyx’ boxes ready for testing to commence at the Trial of Pyx.

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Timeline of the 200 Years of the British Gold Sovereign

The British Sovereign was first imagined in 1489 by King Henry VII, after he instructed officers of his Royal Mint to produce a ‘new money of gold’. Prior to that point, England had enjoyed circulating gold coinage for almost a century and a half, but the new coin, named a Sovereign, was to be the largest coin both in size and value.

Then in 1817, the ‘new sovereign’ made its debut with a newly imagined design featuring St George slaying the dragon. The new design was created by Italian gem engraver Benedetto Pistrucci and was destined to become one of the world’s most loved coin designs.

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Everything you need to know about the MV Royal Daffodil

Our 2020 Dunkirk 80th Anniversary Gold Sovereign Range commemorates the remarkable rescue of Allied troops from the beaches of Northern France, sometimes known as ‘Operation Dynamo’.

The Gold Quarter Sovereign in particular, features a design that pays tribute to the MV Royal Daffodil, a passenger vessel that undertook no fewer than seven trips to the beaches of Dunkirk in 1940 and rescued up to 9,500 troops. On the final trip, a bomb went right through her hull and exploded beneath her; the hole was plugged with a mattress and she made it home. After the War she was refitted and proudly bore a plaque that commemorated her as a ‘Dunkirk Little Ship’.

We are taking a closer look at the Troopship Royal Daffodil and everything you need to know.

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Seven Facts You May Not Know About King George III

King George III

King George III, born in 1738, was a member of the Hanover Dynasty, which ruled England for almost two centuries. He became King of Great Britain in 1760, during some of the most turbulent and trying times, including the American Revolutionary War.

In 1788, an illness brought upon him many mental struggles and uncertainties, with Parliament eventually deeming him unfit to rule, and making his son Prince Regent. He lived with this ‘unknown’ disease for several years before his death in 1820.

We’re taking a look back through the reign of George III, and seven facts that you may not know about him and his life as King.

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Dunkirk 80th Anniversary and Four Facts You May Not Know

The 2020 Dunkirk Anniversary Gold Quarter Sovereign

This year marks the 80th Anniversary of Dunkirk Evacuation, code-named Operation Dynamo; the evacuation of Allied soldiers during World War II from the beaches of Dunkirk.

The operation commenced after large numbers of British, Belgian and French troops were stopped and surrounded by German troops during the six-week Battle of France. The rescue and evacuation lasted almost two weeks between 26th May and 4th June 1940.

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Coin Collecting Glossary – The In’s and Out’s

coin-colecting

If you’re interested in starting coin collecting, but want to do a bit of research beforehand, we think the perfect place to start is learning some of the key terms.

Coin collecting can be both rewarding and intimidating at the same time, with it often seeming like coin collectors are speaking their own unique language. With that in mind, we have put together a glossary of terms to help you along the way and to allow you the best possible chance of starting and progressing your coin collection.

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